Reconciling Jingoistic Tendencies



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The American population, at-large, is clamoring for more jobs. Even those who already have stable jobs are insisting that we need more jobs. Perhaps what we need is a more dedicated, more motivated workforce.

Posted by ryanblair in Agency News, Economics, International, Jacksonville Ad Agency | October 17, 2013

Globally, many other countries work faster, longer, more cheaply, and take greater pride in their work than we do.  If we can look beyond our own self-entitled way of thinking, perhaps we can improve our metrics concerning GDP per capita, quality of life, income disparity, and many others.  People used to take so much pride in the goods that were manufactured in the USA, but it seems very short-sighted to still live by that model.  If you are a manufacturer, you need people that can meet deadlines cheaply and reliably.  Toyota is successful here, in part, due to our extraordinarily high labor costs in automotive manufacturing (due in part to unions).  The textile industry invariably favors Southeast Asia because they can manufacture quality goods and ship them overseas more cheaply than we can even produce them.  

These cost-cutting measures and outsourcing are GOOD.  It allows American entrepreneurs to thrive where they would otherwise flounder by keeping production costs low.  It also allows small businesses and corporations to build international relationships and share their product on a global scale simply by exposing the people who create your product to something that isn't often seen abroad.  If all labor was granted to American employees, we would be hindering market equilibrium and trying to control something that's beyond our means.

 We have become a service industry and a country of innovators.  We're the idea people.  We have reached for the next rung of the ladder of the economic hierarchy, and it's strange to hear people crave regression.  We must not get complacent, and we mustn't falsely assert that protectionist measures will liberate us from the shackles of the free market.  

Tagged as economic inputs,exports,global market,imports,jacksonville ad agency,jingoism,nationalism,protectionism,ryan blair